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Past Featured Rehabilitation Centers:

The Squirrel Sanctuary, Inc. (of Westbury, New York)

 

(from 1997) (NOTE:  Information may be out of date)

Earlier this year, a collective of New York State licensed wildlife rehabilitators working exclusively with tree squirrels, decided it was time to fill a longstanding void in the New York metropolitan area - particularly on Long Island - with respect to squirrels. The handful of existing wildlife centers, all with high profiles and readily recognizable names, devoted most of their attention to raptors and songbirds, making squirrels, in effect, an afterthought. 

With an eye toward providing a place where these small mammals could be assured proper emergency and rehabilitative care, we created a network known as Squirrel Sanctuary, filing incorporation papers with the State of New York, and spreading the word to area veterinarians and animal hospitals, as well as to the established wildlife centers, who were encouraged to phone this all-volunteer network whenever they were presented with a squirrel in distress.

So far this year the Sanctuary has cared for more than 175 squirrels largely in the homes of the participating rehabbers and board members. But the numbers alone do not tell the whole story: Squirrel Sanctuary also believes in educating the public, including members of the medical community, to provide a better transition for the animals who are presented for care. Earlier this summer, the Sanctuary publicly met with the Long Island Veterinary Hospital Managers group - at the group's invitation - to explain proper ways of emergency intake and stabilization of squirrels in distress, until a rehabber can be contacted.

Squirrel Sanctuary has attempted to standardize this protocol for local animal hospitals, many of whom are not familiar with the needs of distressed wildlife, and has even offered to provide "starter" supplies, such as nursing formulas, to facilities needing them.

Squirrel Sanctuary also networks with the community of aspiring wildlife squirrel rehabilitators...offering a volunteer program conducted by a Class 11 Wildlife Rehabilitator.

Still in its "neonate" stages, the Sanctuary shows promise - by virtue of its energy, its imagination and its goals. It is only at the very beginning of its lifetime now but, like any juvenile, it will be given the best nurturing possible to make it - and the squirrels in its care - thrive.


Mission Statement-1997
A non for profit endeavour, are a collective of volunteers; state Licensed Wildlife Rehabilitators and Licensed Wildlife Rehabilitator Assistants who have formed this network to devote our efforts exclusively to the rehabilitation, protection, and preservation of ALL Tree squirrels. Unprecedented on Long Island, we have focused on the Tree Squirrel to directly address needs unmet by existing wildlife centers, where a higher priority is given to avian and other species. We offer rehabilitative care, rescue, and intervention to ALL squirrels that are orphaned, ill, or injured, thus in need of specialized attention, with the objective of returning them back to their natural environment. We offer the public prompt response and the squirrels a safe haven and temporary refuge until release. By attending state and national wildlife conferences and IWRC continuing education classes approved by the American Veterinary Medical Association, we are striving to broaden the ever evolving knowledge base of Wildlife Rehabilitation and to promote professionalism in that field. We expect that our efforts will establish ourselves as a role model for current squirrel rehabilitation protocol within the Wildlife Rehabilitation community and we hope that our work will also serve as an educational tool for those who may consider squirrels nothing more than nuisance animals. By returning them back to their rightful homes in nature, healthy and free, they are once again allowed to continue their purpose.. helping to restore the balance of nature that we so vigorously have unbalanced through land development, clear cutting of trees for highway widening, and artificial lawn maintainance. We can show by our own example and by other's participation and cooperation, that there is a place for each of us in the community of nature. I need to look no further than my own backyard to see our beloved gray squirrel foraging for an acorn and clinging to the tree of life.

Membership is open to ALL who wish to help foster appreciation and respect for our favourite arboreal dweller.

"Ye of the tree shall be healthy and free"--Father McAcorn

Barbara Bellens -Picon
Founder -Squirrel Sanctuary,Inc
Westbury, N.Y.
Sciurusluv@aol.com




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Home • Up • FIND A REHABILITATOR • I FOUND A WILD ANIMAL • CO-EXISTING WITH WILDLIFE • LAWS ABOUT WILDLIFE • WHAT IS WILDLIFE REHAB? • FOR WILDLIFE REHABBERS • CATS AND WILDLIFE • NEWS ABOUT WILDLIFE • ZOONOTIC DISEASES • LINKS • DONATE - SUPPORT TWRID

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Disclaimer:  The advice found on these pages is NOT intended as a do it yourself guide.  All native wildlife needs to be in the skilled hands of a licensed wildlife rehabilitator,  and any medical care must be provided by licensed veterinarians.

If you have an emergency with an injured wild animal, contact your local animal control or humane society for immediate assistance.  

This page last updated 11/27/2012 02:08 AM