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Information for the Rehabilitation Professional



Note:  Some of the links provided on this page may be outdated.  We will update them as time permits.  If you find any broken links, please EMAIL me.

Sites of Interest:

Banded Pigeon Recovery
Here is some information that may prove helpful if you receive a banded pigeon:

If there is an IF on the band, it is registered with the International Federation of Homing Pigeons.  Call  610-664-0266.
 
If there is an AV on the band, it is registered with the Avian Service Center.  405-670-9400 (call 8a - 5p Central)
 
For fancy pigeons and all others, call the National Pigeon Association, at 405-386-6884

Bands on racing pigeons have an AU or IF number, a code for the actual racing club, a date '95 or 96) indicating year- of hatching.  
Fancy pigeons often have a band - to locate owner, call National Pigeon Association.

Malformed Amphibians

Announcing the North American Reporting Center for Amphibian Malformations:

http://www.npsc.nbs.gov/narcam

1-800-238-9801*
Please report malformed amphibians or general amphibian survey results to this Web site or toll-free number. The Reporting Center resides at a Web site that was recently established by USGS/Biological Resources Division staff at the Northern Prairie Science Center (Jamestown, North Dakota) in cooperation with the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency and the Canadian Wildlife Service. The Reporting Center will consolidate observations in a data base so that scientists can search for patterns and trends in type and incidence of malformations. The Web site also contains the following information on malformed amphibians: general locations of reported malformed amphibians, a searchable bibliography, photos of malformations, newspaper clippings, and links to other sites.

Feathers

The National Eagle Repository provides eagle and other bird carcasses to Native Americans for their religious purposes. To meet the requests from Native Americans, this  the Repository needs birds: If you need containers and/or postage-paid shipping labels in order to ship to the Repository, contact  303-287-2110 (ext. 228).


Supply Sources for Wildlife Rehabilitators


"Farming" Your Own Wildlife Food

How to
 
culture mealworms

culture crickets

 

House Finch Conjunctivitis
(submitted by Lessie Davis, North Carolina)

The conjunctivitis appearing in House Finches is caused by Mycoplasma gallisepticum, with the birds displaying inflammed, swollen conjunctival tissue in the eyes accompanied by eye discharge and, in some cases, sinus inflammation and discharge from the nares as well.

Current treatment protocol per Erica A. Miller, DVM, Tri-State Bird Rescue, Delaware, consists of administering the following three (3) drugs simultaneously.

  1. Oxytetracycline hydrochloride with polymyxin B sulfate eye ointment (Terramycin antibiotic ophthalmic ointment, Pfizer Animal Health, New York, NY) in both eyes until all swelling, redness, and discharge is gone. Available through your veterinarian or UPCO.
  2. Tetracycline systemic antibiotic (Panmycin Aquadrops, Upjohn, Kalamazoo, MI) given twice daily by mouth at 250mg/kg (approximately 0.05cc per bird per am and pm dose) for a full 14 days. Available through your veterinarian.
  3. Tylosin tartrate additive to drinking water (Tylan 10, Elanco Animal Health, division of Eli Lilly & Co., Indianapolis, IN) at 1/4 teaspoon powder to 1 quart of water for a full 21 days. Use this as sole source of water to ensure birds receive the drug. Discard unused solution after 3 days. If bird is held over 21 days, continue use of Tylosin on an every other day basis until release. Available through your veterinarian or feed & seed or commercial poultry supply stores.

Research completed in the summer of 1995 by Drs. Ley and Degernes (veterinarians with NC State Veterinary Teaching Hospital) on House Finches which had been treated and cured of conjunctivitis in late summer were also experiencing heavy molt and did not respond completely to initial treatment. The infection was much improved, but there was still slight inflammation and redness in the eyes. Dr. Miller stated that treatment with the oral tetracycline drug could be continued for an additional 7 to 14 days. The Tylosin was given as directed above - 21 days, then every other day thereafter. This resulted in full recovery.

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All rights reserved.  This site and its pages are copyrighted (C) 1995-2013and may not be reproduced , transmitted, linked (to or from) used on any other website, in any manner, without the express written permission of the site owner.  We take a dim view of plagiarism, piracy and theft of our pages.  The views and opinions expressed on this site are strictly those of the page authors, contributors, and the site owner.   Contact the website owner: TWLRID @ gmail.com (remove spaces)

Disclaimer:  The advice found on these pages is NOT intended as a do it yourself guide.  All native wildlife needs to be in the skilled hands of a licensed wildlife rehabilitator,  and any medical care must be provided by licensed veterinarians.

If you have an emergency with an injured wild animal, contact your local animal control or humane society for immediate assistance.  

This page last updated 11/27/2012 02:03 AM