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WHAT IS WILDLIFE REHAB?
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What Is Wildlife Rehabilitation?

"Wildlife rehabilitation involves caring for injured, ill and orphaned wild animals with the goal of releasing each into its natural habitat. Each animal is examined, diagnosed and treated through an individually tailored program of veterinary care, hospital care, feeding, medicating, physical therapy, exercising and pre-release conditioning. Releases are planned for appropriate weather, season, habitat and location. Some animals, of course, are beyond help when found and are humanely euthanized. Unreleasable animals occasionally provide valuable research information or are suitable as educational ambassadors.

Critics of wildlife rehabilitation advocate "Let nature take its course," indicating that distressed wild animals should be allowed to remain free to meet their natural fate. However, records indicate that the majority of injured, ill and orphaned wild animals handled by rehabilitators are suffering not because of "natural" occurrences, but because of human intervention -- some accidental, some intentional, many preventable: autos, trains, mowers, high line wires, firearms, traps, kids throwing stones, woodcutters, picture windows, poisons, oil spills, pets, etc. Rehabilitators ease the suffering of these animals by either caring for them until they can be released or humanely euthanizing them.

Permitted, trained rehabilitators are a valuable link in the network of people and organizations helping wildlife. In addition to returning animals to the wild, they are cooperating to reduce negative human impact on wildlife and the environment. Some are involved in research, captive propagation and reintroduction projects. Many are involved in public education, exposing both children and adults to biological facts, ecological concepts, and a responsible attitude toward all living things. Information from trained, conscientious rehabilitators can and should be used more often to assist in research, law writing and enforcement, population management, habitat preservation, public education programs, and species reintroduction."

- written by the Minnesota Wildlife Assistance Cooperative



Note:  Permits from provincial/state and federal wildlife agencies 
must be obtained in order to possess wildlife (this includes ALL birds 
with the only exceptions being pigeons, European starlings, and house 
sparrows.) Canada has six species not regulated - see Canadian Wildlife Service 
for those species.   

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Home • FIND A REHABILITATOR • I FOUND A WILD ANIMAL • CO-EXISTING WITH WILDLIFE • LAWS ABOUT WILDLIFE • WHAT IS WILDLIFE REHAB? • FOR WILDLIFE REHABBERS • CATS AND WILDLIFE • NEWS ABOUT WILDLIFE • ZOONOTIC DISEASES • LIGHTER SIDE OF REHAB • LINKS • DONATE - SUPPORT TWRID

All rights reserved.  This site and its pages are copyrighted (C) 1995-2013and may not be reproduced , transmitted, linked (to or from) used on any other website, in any manner, without the express written permission of the site owner.  We take a dim view of plagiarism, piracy and theft of our pages.  The views and opinions expressed on this site are strictly those of the page authors, contributors, and the site owner.   Contact the website owner: TWLRID @ gmail.com (remove spaces)

Disclaimer:  The advice found on these pages is NOT intended as a do it yourself guide.  All native wildlife needs to be in the skilled hands of a licensed wildlife rehabilitator,  and any medical care must be provided by licensed veterinarians.

If you have an emergency with an injured wild animal, contact your local animal control or humane society for immediate assistance.  

This page last updated 11/27/2012 02:02 AM